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What To Eat While Watching Sumo: Kokugikan Yakitori

Over the years, many dishes have become synonymous with certain areas of Japan as well as different traditional events. Dairy in Hokkaido, soba at New Year’s and…grilled chicken (Yakitori) at sumo?

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Japan is a nation steeped in tradition. There is a profound reverence for nature and the seasonal foods it provides.

Over the years, many dishes have become synonymous with certain areas of Japan as well as different traditional events. Dairy in Hokkaido, soba at New Year’s and…grilled chicken (Yakitori) at sumo?

A brief history of sumo

Sumo has been practised in Japan for over 1,000 years. In the olden days, local lords would employ samurai (sumo wrestlers) to bout for entertainment.

During Japan’s modernisation in the Meiji Era (1868–1912) the samurai class disappeared which threatened the future of sumo.

People felt that sumo wrestling was old-fashioned and barbaric. Despite this, sumo continued on. In fact, sumo wrestlers still wear the samurai topknot (muge) to this day.

tokyo sumo stadium Kokugikan

(You can read the rest of the article at this link. This article was first published by Team JJ on July 12, 2019. Check here for deeper and unique insights into visiting Japan, including wellness, travel, cuisine and more. Find us on Instagram and on Facebook.)